Generation Tomorrow: Summer Health Disparity Scholars Program

Program Overview:

Generation Tomorrow:  Summer Health Disparity Scholars is launching in the summer of 2019 and will be a 10- week summer program for undergraduate students from across the United States interested in HIV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) health disparities and their intersection with substance use (addiction and overdose), violence, mental health, and the social determinants of health. The program will offer mentorship and training in HIV/HCV education, testing, and counseling; health disparities, cultural competence, and harm reduction. Through a lecture series, the program will also explore the intersection of HIV and/or HCV health disparities with the areas defined above. This program will have a special focus on undergraduate students that are underrepresented in nursing, public health, and medicine with an emphasis on first generation college students and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. The program will consist of the following components:

1. Three-day intensive HIV and HCV testing and counseling training
2. Weekly lecture series
3. Health disparities related research (clinical, health services, biomedical)
4. HIV and/or HCV community-based organization or Johns Hopkins affiliated program internship focused on health disparities and community outreach

Program Leadership:

 Denis Antoine, MD, Director, Motivated Behaviors Unit, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Dr. Denis Antoine is an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Antoine’s clinical expertise is adult psychiatry. Dr. Denis Antoine came to Johns Hopkins for a residency in Psychiatry after graduating from Howard University School of Medicine. After residency, he underwent NIH-sponsored postdoctoral training in addiction research at the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. He is also dually board certified in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. He has since become Director of both the Motivated Behaviors Unit at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Cornerstone at Helping up Mission programs. These programs serve patients with substance use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric conditions and serve as sites for systematic research of issues pertaining substance use disorders. Concurrently, he has published research on abuse liability methodology, the psychiatric assessment of dual diagnosis patients, and technology-assisted treatment for persons with substance use disorders. His other areas of research interest are, clinical effects of marijuana, health services outcomes and feeding behavior and taste changes in the setting of substance use.

 

 Nathan Irvin, MD, MSHPR, Co-Director, Center for Health Humanities, Department of Emergency Medicine, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Dr. Irvin is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He earned a medical degree at Harvard in 2003. Following medical school, he completed a residency in emergency medicine at Alameda Health System’s Highland Hospital in Oakland, California, where he was a chief resident, prior to graduating in 2011.
Upon completion of residency, Dr. Irvin entered into the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 2013 with a master's degree in health policy research.
Dr. Irvin holds interests in social emergency medicine and addressing many of the health and behavioral problems that affect people living in urban communities including violence, HIV/AIDs and substance abuse. He is currently the Director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Emergency Department HIV/HCV screening program, working to identify and get people with new diagnoses of HIV and HCV linked into care. Additionally, he is the ED physician lead for the SBIRT screening program for substance abuse in the Bayview ED and has helped and is part of a team developing a new violence intervention and community trauma response at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Irvin is also the director of the newly minted social emergency medicine 4th year resident Focused Advanced Specialty Training (FAST) opportunity for the Johns Hopkins residency. 

 

  Risha Irvin, MD, MPH, Director, Generation Tomorrow, Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Dr. Risha Irvin is currently an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases where she focuses her research and community engagement projects on improving the health of vulnerable populations impacted by HIV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) including economically disadvantaged persons, racial/ethnic minorities, and people with multi-substance use.  Additionally, she directs Generation Tomorrow, a program which trains students and community members in HIV and HCV education, testing, and counseling and places them in an internship with a community-based organization or Johns Hopkins affiliated program.  The program aims to increase HIV and HCV testing in at-risk populations and engage the next generation of health professionals and community members in work to improve the HIV and/or HCV care continuums.  Dr. Irvin also directs Sharing the Cure, a program which trains primary care providers to treat hepatitis C in the medical home to solve issues around access to care and workforce shortages.  
Dr. Irvin obtained her bachelor’s degree in biology from Spelman College where she was valedictorian and inducted into Phi Beta Kappa.  She then obtained her medical degree and master’s in public health from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. During medical school, she additionally interned for the U.S. Senate in the offices of Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Barack Obama.  Dr. Irvin completed her residency training in internal medicine at the University of California San Francisco in the San Francisco General Primary Care Track.  After residency, Dr. Irvin worked as an HIV research scholar at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and focused on projects investigating risk factors for HIV acquisition and interventions to prevent HIV infection. She additionally served as an HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholar during this time.  Dr. Irvin was also named a 2018 Presidential Leadership Scholar (collaboration between the presidential centers of George W. Bush, William J. Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Lyndon B. Johnson).

Students:

Ngozi Alia , Frostburg State University
My name is Ngozi Alia, and I am a first-generation Nigerian American residing in Prince George’s County, MD. I currently am a junior at Frostburg State University in the General Education Honors Program majoring in Health Science and minoring in African American Studies. In the future, I hope to obtain an MD/MPH. I plan to work with or lead the World Health Organization or a local health department while emphasizing primary and secondary prevention through health education initiatives and social media integration. In my free time, I enjoy volunteering at my local hospital, playing tennis, and visiting new spots in Washington D.C. I am excited to be a part of Generation Tomorrow: Health Disparity Scholars, as I live by and follow the notion that “education is the most powerful weapon that you can use to change the world.”

Nhu Dang, Harvard College
My name is Nhu and I’m a sophomore at Harvard College studying Molecular and Cellular Biology. This is my eighth year being a Baltimorean (my family emigrated here from Vietnam in 2011), and I can’t wait to spend this summer engaging with the communities around the city even more! I’m interested in pursuing medicine with the hopes of bridging medical services to the underserved and immigrant populations in the US. I hope to pursue community service throughout college and future careers, and I’m excited to meet new people, learn their cultures, and understand the various social factors that influence the community’s well-being. In my free time, I love to swim, read, and grab meals with friends. I look forward to joining the Generation Tomorrow family as we work together to improve Baltimore! 

 

Brian Davis, Morehouse College
My name is Brian Davis and I am a junior biology major at Morehouse College. I am the first individual in my family to attend college and to move outside New Orleans, Louisiana, where I was born and raised. I am one out of three triplets that my mom gave birth to on November 6th, 1997. I aspire to become a doctor so that I can provide care for those in need, especially to those in impoverished communities. I am currently learning how to play the piano and speak Spanish too. In my free time, I love to read science fiction books and I love bowling.

 

 

Victoria Garrow, University of Michigan
My name is Victoria Garrow and I am a part of the class of 2021 at the University of Michigan studying Biology, Health, and Society. My desire to be a part of resolving healthcare disparities nationally and world-wide has been affirmed time and time again as I have had the opportunity to do mission work in Haiti, Cuba, and on the Blackfeet Native American Reservation. I believe that Generation Tomorrow: Summer Health Disparities Scholars will prepare me for a life as a compassionate and knowledgeable doctor who cares for individuals suffering from chronic illness who otherwise wouldn’t receive care.

 

Katelyn Howell, Spelman College
My name is Katelyn Howell. I am sophomore, Health Science major at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. I serve as a Resident Advisor for Spelman College’s Office of Housing and Residence Life, as well as the Vice President of Girl Care, an organization dedicated to preparing young girls for their future. Additionally, I serve as the Secretary of LYTEhouse, an Atlanta University Center organization dedicated to mentoring and community service. In the past, I have researched at the Cleveland Clinic Hospital located in Cleveland, Ohio on various health issues ranging from eating disorders to sickle cell anemia. In the future, I aspire to become a physician and advocate for public health issues that plague low income and disadvantaged communities. Through my public health advocacy, I hope to start a non-profit organization and clinic in my hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, dedicated to educating and providing medical services to low income and disadvantaged families.  

 

Sadé Orejobi, University of Miami
My name is Sadé Orejobi and I am a third year undergraduate student from South Florida. I'm majoring in psychology and I hope to attend medical school after I graduate. I am interested in the fields of infectious diseases, anesthesiology and psychiatry. I am passionate about eliminating socioeconomic and racial disparities and am dedicated to intertwining this passion with my love for medicine.

 

 

Daneva Moncrieffe, Brown University
My name is Daneva Moncrieffe, and I am a rising junior at Brown University. I am currently studying Cognitive Neuroscience and am on the pre-med track. I serve as an executive board member of the Black Student Union and volunteer as an adult tutor in the Partnership for Adult Learning program on my campus. I am very interested in the impact that social, environmental, and historical factors have on health outcomes and behaviors influencing health. As a Black woman that hopes to be a future medical professional, I am especially interested in how these factors contribute to physical and mental health disparities in marginalized communities. I hope that this experience in the Summer Internship Program (Generation Tomorrow: Summer Health Disparity Scholars) at Johns Hopkins will prepare me for work as a medical ally in communities of need by working directly with Baltimore residents and community health leaders to address their most urgent needs related to HIV.

John Swift, University of Notre Dame
My name is John Swift and I am from Columbia, Missouri.  I am a rising junior at the University of Notre Dame and am double majoring in Neuroscience and Behavior and Theology. After completing my undergraduate degree I plan on attending medical school and also intend on pursuing an MPH. I am very interested in better understanding the social determinants of health, particularly as it relates to people who inject drugs.  I am a member of the boxing club at Notre Dame, enjoy yoga, and love watching Notre Dame sports.

 

 

Kevin Yoon, University of Michigan
My name is Kevin Yoon, and I am currently an incoming senior at the University of Michigan. I am majoring in Kinesiology. In my free time I enjoy exercising and hiking. Currently, I am interested in pursuing a future in clinical medicine, and finding out who will be sitting on the iron throne at the end of season 8.

 

Stefany Zelaya, University of Maryland, College Park
My name is Stefany Zelaya. I am from Reisterstown, Maryland. I am freshman at the University of Maryland, College Park. I'm currently a Public Health Sciences major on the pre-med track. I hope to minor in Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation. In the future I plan to pursue a career in Pediatrics or Family medicine. On campus, I am on the fundraising committee for Terp Thon which raises money for Children's National Miracle Network Hospital. 


 

 

Student Mentors:


Denis G Antoine, II, MD

Dr. Denis Antoine came to Johns Hopkins for a residency in Psychiatry after graduating from Howard University School of Medicine. After residency, he underwent NIH-sponsored postdoctoral training in addiction research at the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. He is also dually board certified in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. He has since become Director of both the Motivated Behaviors Unit at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Cornerstone at Helping up Mission programs. These programs serve patients with substance use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric conditions and serve as sites for systematic research of issues pertaining to substance use disorders. Concurrently, he has published research on abuse liability methodology, the psychiatric assessment of dual diagnosis patients, and technology-assisted treatment for persons with substance use disorders. His other areas of research interest are, clinical effects of marijuana, health services outcomes and feeding behavior and taste changes in the setting of substance use.

Sherilyn Brinkley, NP

Ms. Brinkley is a Nurse Practitioner Manager and Program Manager of Clinical Services and Research at the Viral Hepatitis Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also a Clinical Provider for the AIDS Service County Program with clinical expertise in the care of persons with hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV co-infections. She served as a Clinical Nurse for an HIV/AIDS-dedicated unit/medical-surgical step-down at Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1990’s and a Community Health Nurse for the AmeriCorps Service Program at the university’s School of Nursing. She has over twenty years of direct patient care and research experience working to eradicate hepatitis C and deliver curative therapies to the Baltimore community. Ms. Brinkley earned her master’s of science in nursing in 1998 (with an adult nurse practitioner concentration) and her bachelor of science in nursing from the JHU School of Nursing. She is a licensed Nurse Practitioner in Maryland and a board-certified Adult Nurse Practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Ms. Brinkley is the author or coauthor of abstracts and publications in the field of viral hepatitis and has presented on the management and delivery of viral hepatitis clinical care at national medical meetings. She has served as an investigator for multiple research protocols and clinical studies.

Christine Durand, MD

Dr. Christine Durand is an associate professor of medicine and oncology and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. She earned a medical degree at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2006. Following medical school, she completed a residency at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is involved in clinical and translational research focused on individuals infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus who require cancer and transplant therapies.  Her current research efforts include looking at outcomes of hepatitis C treatment after solid organ transplant, the potential use of organs from HIV-infected donors for HIV-infected solid organ transplant candidates, and HIV cure strategies including bone marrow transplantation.

Nathan Irvin, MD, MSHPR

Dr. Irvin is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He earned a medical degree at Harvard in 2003. Following medical school, he completed a residency in emergency medicine at Alameda Health System’s Highland Hospital in Oakland, California, where he was a chief resident, prior to graduating in 2011. Upon completion of residency, Dr. Irvin entered into the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 2013 with a master's degree in health policy research. Dr. Irvin holds interests in social emergency medicine and addressing many of the health and behavioral problems that affect people living in urban communities including violence, HIV/AIDs and substance abuse. He is currently the Director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Emergency Department HIV/HCV screening program which works to identify and get people with new diagnoses of HIV and HCV linked into care. Additionally, he is the ED physician lead for the SBIRT screening program for substance abuse in the Bayview ED. He is also a part of a team developing a new violence intervention and community trauma response at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Irvin is also the director of the newly minted social emergency medicine 4th year resident Focused Advanced Specialty Training (FAST) opportunity for the Johns Hopkins residency.

Risha Irvin, MD, MPH

Dr. Risha Irvin is currently an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases where she focuses her research and community engagement projects on improving the health of vulnerable populations impacted by HIV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) including economically disadvantaged persons, racial/ethnic minorities, and people with multi-substance use.  Additionally, she directs Generation Tomorrow, a program which trains students and community members in HIV and HCV education, testing, and counseling and places them in an internship with a community-based organization or Johns Hopkins affiliated program.  The program aims to increase HIV and HCV testing in at-risk populations and engage the next generation of health professionals and community members in work to improve the HIV and/or HCV care continuums.  Dr. Irvin also directs Sharing the Cure, a program which trains primary care providers to treat hepatitis C in the medical home to solve issues around access to care and workforce shortages.  Dr. Irvin obtained her bachelor’s degree in biology from Spelman College where she was valedictorian and inducted into Phi Beta Kappa.  She then obtained her medical degree and master’s in public health from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. During medical school, she additionally interned for the U.S. Senate in the offices of Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Barack Obama.  Dr. Irvin completed her residency training in internal medicine at the University of California San Francisco in the San Francisco General Primary Care Track.  After residency, Dr. Irvin worked as an HIV research scholar at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and focused on projects investigating risk factors for HIV acquisition and interventions to prevent HIV infection. She additionally served as an HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholar during this time.  Dr. Irvin was also named a 2018 Presidential Leadership Scholar (collaboration between the presidential centers of George W. Bush, William J. Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Lyndon B. Johnson).

Kathleen Page, MD

Dr. Kathleen Page, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Her work focuses on improving access and quality of care to underserved communities in Baltimore. She provides HIV, HCV and substance use disorder care at the Bartlett Clinic at JHU and the Baltimore City Health Department STD clinics. She co-founded Centro SOL (Center for Salud/Health and Opportunities for Latinos) which is developing novel strategies to meet the health needs of Latino migrants through research, education, community advocacy, and clinical care.  She is also the Baltimore City Health Department’s Director of STD/HIV/HCV/TB Clinical Services.  She is the principal investigator for an NIH-funded cluster randomized trial evaluating a mobile clinic that provides integrated care to people with opiate use disorder, and on a PCORI-funded randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of a mHealth-enhanced retention support on HIV virologic suppression.  She has also worked with Human Rights Watch to assess the impact of the Venezuelan crisis on public health.  Dr. Page is a recipient of the JHU Diversity Recognition Award, the Mayor’s Hispanic Heritage Award, the Johns Hopkins President’s Award, and the Clinical Excellence Award, and was a JHU SOM 125th Anniversary “Living the Hopkins Mission” Honoree.

Tanjala Purnell, MD, PhD

Dr. Purnell is an Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Transplantation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She holds joint faculty appointments in the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Purnell obtained her bachelor’s degree from Tougaloo College in 2005.  She then obtained her master’s in public health from Ohio State University and a PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Purnell is a Core Faculty member of the Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation, the Associate Director for Education and Training at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity, and a Core Faculty member of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Her research focuses on identifying patient-centered and community-engaged solutions to address disparities in access to and quality of care for patients with kidney disease and related risk factors, including diabetes and hypertension. Her course, "Applications of Innovative Methods in Health Equity Research," is offered through the Department of Health Behavior and Society. A native of the Mississippi Delta, Dr. Purnell is a health services researcher and social epidemiologist whose work focuses on identifying and addressing patient/family, healthcare system, and community-level factors that contribute to health disparities for patients with chronic illnesses, particularly kidney disease and related conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension. Her work on NIH and PCORI-funded studies has involved the development of educational and behavioral interventions to reduce disparities in chronic disease management, access to transplantation, and shared treatment decision making for patients and their families.

Renee M. Johnson, PhD, MPH

Dr. Renee M. Johnson, PhD, MPH, is an associate professor of mental health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Johnson received her BA in Sociology from Spelman College. She received her MPH in Health Behavior and her Ph. D. in Health Behavior and Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Johnson’s research addresses the health of adolescents and emerging adults, with a focus on substance use and violence. Much of this work involves marginalized populations, including people of color, LGBT youth, trauma-exposed youth, immigrants, and youth in low-income, urban areas. Her current work examines marijuana use among adolescents and emerging adults.

 

 

Guest Lecturers:

Larry Chang, MD, MPH  
Dr. Larry Chang is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His area of clinical expertise is infectious diseases, with a special focus on HIV. He also holds joint appointments in epidemiology and international health in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Chang received his medical degree and a master’s in public health from Emory University. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of California-San Francisco and completed his fellowship in infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2009. Research in the Larry Chang Lab focuses on innovative, multidisciplinary and pragmatic approaches to impacting the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The research investigates ways to improve HIV/AIDS care in low- and middle-income settings through strategies that include quantitative methods, qualitative methods, community-based trial designs, and behavioral science and economic evaluations. In addition, we research mobile technologies for health (mHealth) strategies for improving global public health and clinical care, including novel applications for intimate-partner violence intervention, dengue surveillance, and HIV care, surveillance and prevention.

Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH
Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH, is the Medical Director for the Institutes for Behavior Resources Inc/REACH Health Services, a comprehensive outpatient addiction treatment center in Baltimore City. She also provides part-time medical consultation to the local behavioral health authority for Baltimore City and the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration. After medical training at Harvard Medical School, and internal medicine residency with a year as Primary Care Chief Resident at the Boston Medical Center, she received a Master’s in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health as part of a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  She has previously served as the Vice President of Clinical Affairs for the Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems, as the Deputy Health Officer for the Harford County Health Department, and as the Medical Director for the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s outpatient substance use treatment services. Dr. Olsen also serves as Vice President for the American Society of Addiction Medicine and is on the board of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of Maryland. She is co-author of the book, “The Opioid Epidemic: What Everyone Needs to Know.”

Kimberly Cauley Narain, MD, PhD, MPH
Dr. Narain completed her residency in Primary Care Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Following residency she completed a California Endowment Minority Health Policy Fellowship at Harvard Medical School. As a California Endowment Scholar she worked with the Institute of Urban Health Research to evaluate the impact of place-based housing infrastructure interventions on health outcomes. After leaving Harvard, she completed a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar Fellowship at UCLA. During this fellowship she served as an intern for the California Center for Public Health Advocacy and conducted research projects evaluating the implementation of a municipal healthy vending machine policy and examining the effects of socioeconomic status on weight gain. Upon completion of this fellowship Dr. Narain stayed on at UCLA as a Specialty Training Advanced Research Fellow in the Department of General Internal Medicine & Health Services Research and earned a Ph.D. in Health Services from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Her dissertation work explored how changing eligibility requirements and the imposition of time limits for cash transfer programs impacted the access to health care and health of single mothers. Prior to joining the faculty in the Department of General Internal Medicine & Health Services Research at UCLA Dr. Narain was an Advanced Health Services Research Fellow in the West Los Angeles VA Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation & Policy. Broadly, she has an interest in evaluating the implications of health and social policies for health equity among women, individuals with low socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic minorities.

Kathleen Page, MD
Dr. Kathleen Page, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Her work focuses on improving access and quality of care to underserved communities in Baltimore. She provides HIV, HCV and substance use disorder care at the Bartlett Clinic at JHU and the Baltimore City Health Department STD clinics. She co-founded Centro SOL (Center for Salud/Health and Opportunities for Latinos) which is developing novel strategies to meet the health needs of Latino migrants through research, education, community advocacy, and clinical care.  She is also the Baltimore City Health Department’s Director of STD/HIV/HCV/TB Clinical Services.  She is the principal investigator for an NIH-funded cluster randomized trial evaluating a mobile clinic that provides integrated care to people with opiate use disorder, and on a PCORI-funded randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of a mHealth-enhanced retention support on HIV virologic suppression.  She has also worked with Human Rights Watch to assess the impact of the Venezuelan crisis on public health.  Dr. Page is a recipient of the JHU Diversity Recognition Award, the Mayor’s Hispanic Heritage Award, the Johns Hopkins President’s Award, and the Clinical Excellence Award, and was a JHU SOM 125th Anniversary “Living the Hopkins Mission” Honoree.

Noe’ Romo, MD, MSc
Dr. Romo received his B.S from the University of California, Riverside and went on to obtain his M.D degree from The Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed his Pediatrics residency at NYC Health + Hospitals Jacobi where he also served as Chief Resident. After residency he completed the Primary Care Clinical Research Fellowship in Community Health in the Division of Child & Adolescent Health at Columbia University, where he also obtained an M.S in Epidemiology from The Mailman School of Public Health with a focus on the epidemiology of violence and the use of violence prevention strategies in inner city youth. He joined the faculty at The Lewis M. Fraad Department of Pediatrics at NYC Health + Hospitals Jacobi in July 2014 as a Pediatric Hospitalist Attending and is now Director of the Pediatrics Inpatient Service, Site Director of the Pediatrics Sub-internship and is an Assistant Professor in Pediatrics at The Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is also medical director of the Stand Up to Violence program which is a hospital based community violence prevention initiative at NYC Health + Hospitals Jacobi.  His research interests include the epidemiology of violence and the design, implementation, and evaluation of violence prevention strategies to improve morbidity and mortality in young victims of violent trauma.

Dina Romo, MD
Dr. Dina Romo is an adolescent medicine specialist. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein college of Medicine and the Director of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health at New York City Health + Hospitals/Jacobi in the Bronx. Dr. Romo is board certified in Pediatrics and board certified in Adolescent Medicine. Her main areas of interest are in adolescent sexual and reproductive health, including contraceptive care and STI treatment and prevention, and she has published and presented on several adolescent health topics. Dr. Romo graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. She completed her adolescent medicine fellowship at Columbia University Medical Center and an additional fellowship with the National Network of STD Prevention Centers.

 

Sherita Golden, MD, MHS
Dr. Sherita Hill Golden is the Hugh P. McCormick Family Professor of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Executive Vice-Chair of the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As of July 1st, she will assume the role of vice president, chief diversity officer for Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Golden received her M.D. from the University of Virginia and her M.H.S. from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She holds joint appointments in the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and in the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality.  She is Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Inpatient Glucose Management Program.  The author of more than 130 articles, 12 book chapters, and 4 monographs, Dr. Golden’s primary research interests center around (1) identifying endocrine risk factors associated with the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease; (2) examining mental health complications of diabetes and the biological, hormonal, and behavioral factors that explain these associations, (3) understanding and eliminating diabetes health disparities, and (4) implementing and evaluating systems interventions to improve patient safety and quality of care in hospitalized patients with diabetes. She was Chairperson of the Endocrine Society’s first Scientific Statement on Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders.  She serves as the Principal Investigator of the Johns Hopkins site of the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcome Study.  In 2013, she was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation.  Dr. Golden is a devoted mentor and currently serves as Director of the Epidemiology and Clinical Research in Diabetes and Endocrinology Training Grant.

 

Senior Advisory Committee:

Chris Beyrer, MD, MPH, Co-Director, Center for AIDS Research, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Deidra Crews, MD, ScM, Associate Vice Chair for Diversity and Inclusion, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Richard E. Chaisson, MD, Director, Center for AIDS Research, Professor, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Jason E. Farley, PhD, MPH, ANP-BC, AACRN, FAAN, Director, PhD Program/REACH Initiative, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Darrell J. Gaskin, PhD, Director, Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Medicine

Rev. Debra Hickman, M. Div., President/CEO, Sisters Together and Reaching, Inc. (STAR)

Gabor D. Kelen, M.D., FACEP, FAAEM, FRCP(C), Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Shruti H. Mehta, PhD, Deputy Chair, Department of Epidemiology, Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Joshua M. Sharfstein, MD, Vice Dean, Public Health Practice and Community Engagement, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Medicine

Susan G. Sherman, PhD, Professor, Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

David L. Thomas, MD, MPH, Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Professor, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Jordan White, MS, Baltimore Collaboratory Program Coordinator, Doctoral Student, Center for Public Health and Human Rights, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health